top ten tuesday – ten books i wish i could have read in school

i am participating in the “top ten tuesday”, which is a weekly challenge hosted by the broke and the bookish. the challenge is back after a summer hiatus and now we can dive back into new topics. this week’s topic is “back to school freebie”. now, what you need to know for this. i went to school in germany and the only books we read were in my german class. all of them were just bad. i hated them and i wasn’t a big fan of it. in my english class we read almost nothing. the only thing was the shakespeare play “much ado about nothing”, which was sooooo cool. we also watched the movie then and i loved it. but unfortunately, there was nothing more. so that’s how this list came to life, because here you can see, what i would have wanted to read in school.

 

“ten books i wish i could have read in school”

 

1.) “the outsiders” by s.e. hinton

outsiders

once again this book made it to my list. why? it’s pretty easy. the writing is good, the characters are great and the story is amazing and scary at the same time. i wish we could have read this in school, because it is an important book and i think everybody should read “the outsiders”.

 

2.) “the book thief” by markus zusak

bookthief

well, this book came out, when i was already out of school haha. but i wish, that it would have been there back then and that we would have read it. i think there is no better way to understand the cruelty of the second world war than this book. it’s crushing and it’s very emotional and i probably would have been a mess back then in school, but it really brings you close to what was happening back then. it is also beautifully written and i think it should become a required reading in every school.

 

3.) “wonder” by r.j. palacio

wonder

this is another book that just came out a couple of years ago. but i wish, that it would have been there back in my school time. this book is just wonderful and it shows that it’s all about the inner beauty. about how you shouldn’t and how you should be towards other people. i loved auggie’s story and i think it’s a perfect book to read in school.

 

4.) “animal farm” by george orwell

animalfarm

i think “animal farm” by george orwell is also a perfect book to read in school. first of all it is short, which is important for school, because kids do not like to be forced into reading big books for school. second of all it describes wonderfully, how society can get and it’s written in a way, everybody can understand and even have fun while reading it. i don’t think i would have liked “1984”, but i think “animal farm” is a perfect book for school.

 

5.) “the perks of being a wallflower” by stephen chbosky

theperks

i remember reading “the perks of being a wallflower” and i really loved and enjoyed it a couple of years ago. i think it is a wonderful book and i think that a lot of teenagers can relate to the characters.

 

6.) “thirteen reasons why” by jay asher

thirteen

now, i debated with myself, if i should put this book on this list or not. and i think it deserves a spot. it’s a book about bullying and the consequences it has, when one person isn’t treated right. it’s a book where you start to think about other people and if you are maybe hurting them the way you treat them. so yeah, i think this book should definitely be read in school.

 

7.) “wild” by cheryl strayed

wild

now i know, that this book is hard at some points, but it’s the true story of a woman who got lost. and i think everybody sometimes gets lost and needs to find their way. and i think at the end of high school you are sometimes at a point where you don’t know where to go. so i think that would be a great time to read this book.

 

8.) “the last lecture” by randy pausch

lastlecture

i remember when a good friend of mine gave me this book and said: “just read it.” i didn’t know what it was about but i started and had goosebumps all the time. it’s about living your life to the fullest. every day. a motto i try to live by every day! 🙂

 

9.) “great expectations” by charles dickens

greatexpectations

awwww, one of my favorites. i know that “great expectations” is a long book. but it is easy to read and it is such a beautiful story, that everyone can get lost in it. i think it is a classic, that many students would enjoy to read, because it is the story of pip and how he grows up. it’s about how he presumes things, that aren’t true and that it isn’t always how it seems to be.

 

10.) “the hunger games” by suzanne collins

hungergames

ok, i realize that my list may be a little too serious. 😀 but believe me, i come from a good place and just want that everyone is good to each other and lives their life without regret. but now, let’s add some fun, shall we? 😀 and i think “the hunger games” is a perfect way to do this. i was hooked reading this book, and i was 31 years old, when i first read it. so i can imagine, that kids in school will love this. and i think, since it’s a series it’s the perfect way to get kids to read it and who knows, maybe some of them will turn into bookfreaks like us 😀

 

 

alright, that is my list of books i wish i could have read in school. i am sad, that i couldn’t but at least i was able to do it throughout my life and i am sure there are many more waiting for me, which will maybe be included in some other list in the future. let me know, if you had to read some of these in school and what you think about them. also, which books would you want for kids to read in school? 🙂

28 thoughts on “top ten tuesday – ten books i wish i could have read in school”

  1. I read Great Expectations in my AP English class during my senior year of high school and I loved it SO MUCH… except I was pretty much the only person in the class who felt that way haha 🙂 I totally agree with you about Animal Farm! I read it on my own a few years ago and loved it, but I feel like it would have sparked such great discussions if read with a class. Awesome list! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Cool picks 👍 I totally agree with 13 reasons why and the Book thief (haven’t read the rest of the books mentioned so I can’t really speak for them) but your reasonings behind choosing those are very accurate and true 💖💕

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yaaas! Deine Wahl von “The Outsiders” stimme ich auf jeden Fall zu. Das ist auch somit das erste klassische Buch, was man ohne Zweifel als Jugendbuch einordnen kann. Zu “Animal Farm” muss ich sagen, dass ich viele Leute kenne, die es damals in der Schule lesen mussten, und absolut hassten. Ich glaube, es ist nicht unbedingt das perfekte Buch für den Unterricht, da man als Lehrer automatisch den Fokus auf die russiche Revolution legt, und viele Schüler da einfach mental ausschalten. Ich finde das ist so ein Buch, was man für sich selbst entdecken sollte.

    Und ebenfalls wäre “Great Expectations” als Schullektüre wohl der absolute Horror für mich gewesen. Das Buch wäre für den Unterrichtsrahmen wohl sowieso viel zu lang, aber gäbe auch nicht viel für Diskussionen mit Achtklässlern her. Ich finde die Brillianz von Dickens ist so subtil, dass man das gut im universitären Rahmen ausdiskutieren und analysieren könnte, mit Oberschülern aber meiner Meinung nach eher nicht.

    Wie auch immer, musste mal wieder meinen Senf dazu geben (what’s new?). Ich finde das Thema aber wirklich interessant. Vielleicht setze ich das irgendwann mal als Video um. 😀

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    1. haha, dein kommentar ist im spam ordner gelandet 😀 was das wohl sagt 😛
      ich glaube, ich hätte mich damals sehr über “animal farm” gefreut. kann mich da natürlich täuschen, aber ich glaube, es ist einfach auf eine art erzählt, die anders ist und die schon packend sein kann. ich kenne leider niemanden, der es in der schule lesen musste, daher keine ahnung 😀

      und “great expectations” finde ich für die 8. klasse auch zu heftig. aber ich glaube in einem englisch leistungskurs (die gabs damals in meiner oberstufe) hätte ich das mega geil gefunden. da interessiert man sich für die englische sprache und ich glaube dieses buch dann durchzugehen, wäre der knaller gewesen. aber auch nur im englisch leistungskurs. ich glaube im deutschkurs hätte ich das nicht so gut gefunden. aber das ist dann wieder die einstellung zwischen deutschen und englischen büchern…

      aber schön, dass du mir wenigstens bei “the outsiders” zustimmst hahaha 😀
      und ja, sehr gerne video machen!

      Like

  4. Great list! I didn’t read any of these until I was out of school as well, some I still have yet to get to. But I do wonder if my teenage self would have liked/appreciated these as much as I did as an adult. Happy Reading!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. The only book on this list that is mandatory reading at my school is Animal Farm. I’m pretty sure that we have to read it in the grade 11 english course. Classics and Shakespeare are basically all we read at my school, but I feel like it would be super cool to read some YA literature in the english courses. Also, I am totally bumping Great Expectations up on my TBR! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  6. This is such a fantastic list!! One of my favorites has to be Great Expectations, which I actually did read in school, and I had a really passionate teacher who made it fun, and I’ve had a love of Charles Dickens books since.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. His books are definitely a time consuming but I’ve read maybe 5 of them now? I love how long and winding and rather whimsical his stories are. David Copperfield and Oliver Twists are other faves.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Great list! I think our local high schools have The Book Thief on their reading lists now, which is just so cool! I did read Animal Farm and The Outsiders in school, but there are so many others here that I think would be great for getting kids involved and excited. I wish I’d read more Dickens!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I actually read The Outsiders for the first time in school, so I was super lucky!! And I totally agree, I feel like reading The Book Thief would have really enhanced our understanding of the tragedy of the Holocaust, plus it really emphasizes the importance of literacy.

    Liked by 1 person

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